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Turing CEO Jonathan Siddharth Explains Why Silicon Valley Companies Are Shifting To Remote Work
For Employers

Turing CEO Jonathan Siddharth Explains Why Silicon Valley Has Moved to the Cloud

Silicon Valley companies are hiring for remote software developer jobs. Turing CEO explains the reasons behind the rapid adoption of remote work policies.

The pandemic drove a rapid — and in many cases, unplanned — shift to remote work across the world. Many Silicon Valley companies have realized that there are significant benefits to keeping teams remotely distributed. In a recent TechCrunch post, Jonathan Siddharth, CEO, and co-founder of Turing elaborated on the reasons behind this shift. 

Here are the key takeaways:

Every company is now offering remote jobs

“Silicon Valley may still be the best place to start a company, but if you’re a founder, it’s now financially reckless to scale your company in the Bay Area. Boundaryless companies are now the new normal — and this transformation calls for a new way to build companies with a globally distributed workforce,” noted Siddharth. 

He highlighted the three factors responsible for this change:

Hiring remote talent is easier and often economically advantageous

The last few years saw an abundance of remote talent. “Accessibility to online courses through MOOCS like Udacity has democratized access to high-quality education, resulting in more talented and well-trained individuals all over the world. At the same time, competition in Silicon Valley has made it increasingly costly and time-consuming to recruit talent,” Siddharth explained. 

Owing to these factors, hiring candidates with Silicon Valley level skill-sets from a diverse talent pool is becoming more commonplace.

Co-located companies find it hard to attract and even harder to retain great people

Interest in remote work remains high. In fact, many people are willing to forego a pay raise to work remotely. Consider: Blind’s survey of 3000+ employees from the largest US companies—including Google, Amazon, and Microsoft—found that 64 percent of respondents chose permanent remote work over a $30K pay raise. 

SaaS tools for remote teams have evolved through the years

Efficient and easy-to-use SaaS tools have contributed significantly to the rise of remote teams. “Tools like GitHub, Slack, Zoom, Trello, etc., have enabled distributed teams to efficiently collaborate across time zones and boundaries, bringing them on par with co-located teams. Additionally, they’ve enabled employers to hire the best talent from anywhere in the world,” Siddharth said.

Challenges stopping companies from going remote-first

Siddharth highlighted three obstacles that can prevent companies from running remote:

It’s difficult to find remote, Silicon Valley-caliber talent for software developer jobs

Cheap, remote talent is abundant in the market. “You can go to several open labor marketplaces and bid for developers or, you can find a dev shop. The problem is quality because, in many marketplaces, there is no vetting,” noted the Stanford alum. And thus, although it’s easy to source average developers, it’s hard to find brilliant, highly experienced talent, Siddharth explained.

Evaluating global candidates is tricky 

Vetting remote talent to determine the right match for a company’s needs is difficult. Traditional CVs offer hiring managers little real insight into their actual skills and qualifications. In addition, CVs typically don’t provide information about the quality of schools the candidate attended or little-known companies for which the candidate worked. 

Said Siddharth: “If you’re hiring a developer from Sao Paulo, Brazil, you won’t see Stanford or Berkeley in her educational experience. What’s the Stanford of Brazil? You won’t see Google, Facebook, etc., on a resume either. The individual you hire could be your next 10X engineer, but it’s hard to determine the reality based on a resume alone. Without deep knowledge of companies and schools in a particular region, it can be hard to recruit efficiently.”

Managing a remote team is difficult

Companies transitioning to a remote-first paradigm often find it difficult to manage and operate distributed teams. Ensuring efficient communication across time zones is often a big challenge. Consequently, it isn’t easy to ensure that remote developers are working on what’s most valuable to the organization. 

“The nuts and bolts of running a globally distributed team are not easy. It’s painful to manage international payments. It’s complex to handle Global HR correctly from a compliance and worker classification perspective, and it’s pretty challenging to stay fully compliant with international labor laws. For these reasons, we see the birth of the Deep Talent Cloud,” Siddharth said.

How can an Intelligent Talent Cloud help to hire a software developer online?

A Talent Cloud is a category of organizations that spin up teams in the cloud with just the push of a button. 

They are vertically focused 

Siddharth explained the advantages of a deep talent cloud over a labor marketplace: “Unlike a labor marketplace, an intelligent talent cloud is vertically focused and precise, making it capable of delivering candidates that have been rigorously evaluated for each specific industry/vertical. Deep talent clouds are often SaaS-enhanced to offer additional value to both sides of the marketplace. For example, Turing is an intelligent talent cloud focused on software developers as a vertical. There are very effective talent clouds being built for other verticals.” 

Intelligent Talent Clouds go beyond connecting two sides of a marketplace

Thin marketplaces worked fine for office-based organizations where remote work was the exception. Siddharth outlined why: “Labor marketplaces do very little beyond connecting the two sides of demand and supply. They are not tailor-made for a specific vertical. Instead, they are suitable for small, gig-based work that’s relatively low stakes. Today’s remote-first era needs a Deep Talent Cloud that goes well beyond simply connecting both sides of a marketplace.”

A Deep Talent Cloud may offer other features such as: 

  • Supply vetting
  • Demand vetting
  • Collaboration tools 
  • Security controls 
  • Training/upskilling
  • Supply Credentialing 
  • Community
  • Financial Services, 
  • Insurance
  • Payments 
  • HR Services 
  • Tax assistance
  • Industry-specific perks

They are SaaS-enabled

“Companies such as OysterHR, Remote.com & Deel are examples of companies that offer excellent SaaS solutions to solve problems like global HR, payments, etc. Collaboration tools like Miro, Mural, etc., make remote professionals more efficient. There are also vertical-specific SaaS tools like Invision that make design collaboration more effective,” he noted.

Siddharth concluded that the shift to remote is more than just a post-pandemic phenomenon. He stated that we are entering the golden era of remote work. As a result, remote-first companies have an unfair advantage over their competitors in hiring, retention, speed of execution, and financial efficiency. To be competitive in this new reality, employers must update their office-based processes to enable the new remote work culture. Fortunately, there is a growing landscape of companies developing cloud-based tools that will help them get there. 

Are you looking to replace your traditional, on-premise engineering recruitment system with an efficient cloud-based one? If yes, check out Turing. Turing’s automated platform lets companies “push a button” to hire senior, pre-vetted remote software developers. Turing lets employers access a talent pool of the top 1% of 700K+ developers with strong technical and communication skills who work in your time zone. There’s no risk. Turing offers a free two-week trial period to ensure your developers deliver to your standards.

For more information, visit Turing’s Hire page.

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By Sep 1, 2021
An artificial nose to showcase artificial intelligence companies developing a sense of smell
For Developers

Artificial Intelligence Is Developing a Sense of Smell

A crucial question Covid patients face: How to regain their sense of smell? Artificial intelligence companies may soon help with that.

It hasn’t been long since engineers enabled machines to see and make decisions based on their observations. Now, they can smell too. A Grenoble-based startup is making use of artificial intelligence combined with digital olfaction to mimic the human sense of smell and help customers convert odor data into actionable information. 

Digital Olfaction – How it Works

The human nose uses the odor molecules released by inorganic and organic objects to enable the sense of smell. The odor evaporates when the energy in objects increases, helping inhale and absorb them through the nasal cavity. 

Digital olfaction works in a similar fashion. First, it captures odor signatures using biosensors and then uses software solutions to analyze the given odor data and display the results. Artificial intelligence helps interpret the signatures and classify them based on a database of previously collected smells. 

In a recent interview, the company CEO said that in terms of performance and its ability to recognize different smells, digital olfaction is close to the way human noses work.

Practical Uses of Digital Olfaction

Odor analytics can help companies: 

  • Engineer the ideal “new car” smell for the automotive industry
  • Catch food spoilage in consumer appliances
  • Approve or reject raw material supply
  • Lower R&D time for new beverages and foods
  • Create health sensors and personal care devices that use odors to detect possible issues and alert users

One possible use of this technology is to assist in developing devices that help COVID-19 patients recover their sense of smell.

Read more about this technology

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By Jun 16, 2021
Akshay Thakor, Turing SVP of Operations
Turing News

Postmates VP Akshay Thakor Joins Turing as SVP of Operations

In his new role at Turing, Akshay will lead the global operations team and all activities related to the Turing developer community.

Akshay Thakor has joined Turing as SVP Operations. Most recently, Akshay was VP of Business Operations at Postmates, where he was instrumental in building the infrastructure and community that fueled Postmates’ growth and ultimate acquisition by Uber. 

In his new role at Turing, Akshay will lead our global operations team and all activities related to our developer community of more than 400,000 international software engineers. 

By way of introduction, we recently interviewed Akshay about his new role and the reasons he joined Turing. 

Turing: Hi Akshay. I’d like to start by asking you what attracted you to Turing?

Akshay: The first thing to attract me to Turing is our core mission and the vision we are trying to achieve. The idea of helping talented developers worldwide and matching them with amazing job opportunities across Silicon Valley is very purposeful and empowering. Across the globe, you have software developers who are looking to find ways to step up in their careers. Giving them opportunities to work on important projects, to earn more, to choose their own path can be very significant. We can have a positive impact on the lives of very talented people.

The other key attraction for me at Turing was the opportunity to solve a real pain point — hiring strong software developers in Silicon Valley is difficult, time-consuming, and expensive. And hiring them at scale is an even bigger challenge. I believe Turing is solving this problem in an elegant and unique manner by using AI and machine learning to build an intelligent talent cloud. They are essentially re-inventing the traditional IT services and staffing industry and building an AWS for Talent!

Lastly, I was impressed by the Turing executive team – a set of amazing and passionate folks who are experts in their domain. It’s a diverse group with different backgrounds who each bring a unique perspective and unique values. That’s the secret sauce when you figure out a company you want to work with or an idea you want to scale.

Turing: At Postmates, you were able to change an entire market or maybe even create one. That seems to tie in nicely with how you see Turing evolving. So how do you think that experience will carry over to what you will be doing here at Turing?

Akshay: Yes, you are spot on about Postmates creating markets as we were the first food delivery app in the US when we launched in 2011. We were able to innovate and create many firsts in the market; something I am extremely proud of. That experience was instrumental in developing my approach to thinking about every problem from a customer’s perspective. The ability to identify and acknowledge problems, figuring out creative solutions that address those pain points, and then launching solutions that scale effectively is what I am really good at.

And that skill translates perfectly at Turing. It will allow me to build our developer platform as we scale it globally. Today, the solutions that worked for hiring software engineers 20 years ago are redundant and have neither seen any innovation nor are they adapting to the changing landscape of remote work. And that’s why we, at Turing, are re-imagining those problems and their solutions. We need those solutions to be innovative and operate at scale for our customers as well as developers. This is where I can bring a lot of value and create one of the most impactful companies of the next decade. I am looking forward to working with the entire Turing team and creating something huge and impactful, something we will look back and be extremely proud of.  

Turing: You make it sound very exciting! Tell us a bit about your specific responsibilities. What areas will you be driving into?

Akshay: My core responsibilities will be focused on two areas. First is to manage and lead global operations across Turing. A business of our scale is a combination of tech plus operations and I want to ensure that both work hand-in-hand as we scale our company. We are a remote-first company and will continue to build a global team, especially across LatAm, Africa, Europe, and Asia.

My second and most important area of focus is to build, grow and lead our global developer platform. I am responsible for creating and driving a holistic approach to our developer ecosystem while building a thriving, engaging community. Key questions for me are — how do they think about Turing? How do we make Turing the best place for a developer to work at? How do we engage with them such that they become our strongest advocate? How do we ensure they have a WOW experience on our platform and become our evangelists?

We believe the Turing platform is very empowering to developers. It gives them the ability to grow their careers on their own terms, to work on the projects they love. And it’s a very sustainable way for developers to work without having to continuously look for their next job. 

I’m responsible for ensuring Turing continues to grow and scale its developer ecosystem so we can continue to meet our customers’ needs, while also engaging our developers so as to make them feel valued and proud to be a part of the Turing community.

Turing: As you think about your first year here at Turing, what are a couple of things you hope to accomplish?

Akshay: That’s a great question. The first thing I want to accomplish is to examine all of our existing systems and make sure we have the right processes in place to set us up for success as we continue to scale. For fast scaling startups, the Japanese concept of Kaizen – continuous improvement – is very critical. We always need to push ourselves to be better, hire the right people and set up scalable processes. That will be an important area of focus for me in the first year. 

In parallel, my goal will be to set up a mid-to-long-term vision for my teams and ensure that we can see a path for us to get to it. The key questions for me are — How do we articulate a vision that motivates and drives our team? What foundations do we need to build to achieve that vision? How can we accelerate the process and get there faster? How can we make sure our customers and our developers have the most amazing experience? What are the building blocks we need to achieve our longer-term vision?

These are important questions that a business leader needs to constantly think about. We need to listen to our customers, to our developers, and understand their needs. It is really important to be connected to your customers and obsessively focusing on customer service.

Turing: What do you see as some of the big opportunities for Turing over the next few years. 

Akshay: Turing’s ability to scale and grow our global developer community is one of our most impactful and meaningful propositions. There are exceptionally talented people across the globe, but there aren’t enough opportunities for them. We empower them to build their own career paths and give them the freedom to work across top companies. What we need to realize is the impact this has on local communities and how it allows talented developers to uplevel their economic situation. They are able to earn more and work with some of the best companies across the world while working from their home and local geography. Imagine this at a vast global scale and the positive impact it can create. Imagine as we expand our business to providing training, internships, and skill enhancement programs to a diverse set of age groups. Imagine how empowering it can be from a social, cultural, and economic perspective. That is the mission for Turing, and it’s our biggest opportunity.

Another area that I deeply value is our core technical platform — our AI-driven talent cloud — that is not only unique but also critical for us to scale. We are a tech-first company, and what we are building is innovative. Our intelligent vetting and matching algorithm uses a blend of data science and machine learning; something that hasn’t been done before at our scale within our industry. And we use it to find an ideal match between our customers and developers. Over time, as we continue to invest in our technology, it will be our biggest differentiator and will create a plethora of opportunities for us. 

Turing: One final question. One of Turing’s values is continuous learning. So we ask every new team member, what is the one course you would like to teach and how would you go about teaching it?

Akshay: A very interesting question. There are two answers to this — one is a work-related course and the other is a fun, personal course. For the first one, I would like to teach a course on effective communication. I believe it is an important skill that is immensely valuable but not a strong point for a lot of folks, especially young professionals. I have been fortunate to learn a lot from my past experience as a consultant to Fortune 500 CXOs and at Postmates. The course would focus on how to be an effective storyteller so that you create empathy with your audience, align with your stakeholders, and provide clarity to your team. 

As part of my personal hobby, I am passionate about Japanese comic art, Manga, and its televised adaptation, Anime. They have some amazing stories, brilliant artwork and are extremely popular across the globe, especially in the US. I would love to teach a course on the history of anime in the US and how it got popular across some genres. I believe that would be a unique and fun course for people to learn more about this global phenomenon.

Turing: I’m sure you’ll have a lot of interest in both courses. Thank you Akshay, and welcome to Turing. 

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By Jun 15, 2021
linkedin shares remote work approach3
For Employers

LinkedIn VP of Engineering Heather McKelvey Discusses the Company’s Approach to Remote Work at Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic Conference

Heather McKelvey, LinkedIn’s VP of Engineering, discussed the secrets behind high-performance remote teams at Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic Event.

Heather McKelvey, Vice President of Engineering for LinkedIn, discussed the secrets to developing high-performance in distributed teams with Emma Giles, Co-Founder & COO of Sophya, at Turing Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic conference, that took place on May 13, 2021.

Highlights of the session included:

Strong sponsorship develops high performance 

Emma began the session by asking Heather to define the key characteristics of high-performing teams, to which she answered: 

  • Strong leadership
  • Execution (fulfilling your goal and simultaneously learning something)
  • Craftsmanship (building something that can be easily maintained or scaled)

To achieve high performance, Heather advised leaders to assemble and consult a board of mentors, not just one mentor. A board can combine its strengths and offer greater insights to the mentee, she explained. 

Heather also recommended, “Look past mentorship and towards sponsorship.” A mentor helps you identify your strengths and opportunities, she said. A sponsor promotes you within exclusive circles. “Teaching people what a sponsor relationship is, is key,” she explained.

Don’t raise the bar prematurely 

Heather cautioned leaders against constantly raising the bar for their teams. She suggested, “Raise the bar. Stop and celebrate. Then, when the team is ready, raise the bar again.”

Agreeing, Emma offered an example: When leadership raised the bar for the Sophya team, the group seemed to internalize it quickly. Rather than raise the bar again right away, the management group decided to wait. That turned out to be the right decision as they found the overall team needed more time to operate at that higher level, she explained.

Following up on Heather’s comment about celebration, Emma asked how managers could bring teams together to celebrate achievements—before raising the bar again. Heather recommended arranging events that unite employees with common interests.

She also suggested organizing activities that involve employees’ families—and offered magic shows as an example. Emma pointed out that the digital world blurs the line between personal and professional. “Moments of celebration can now have a more personal element,” she added. 

Set your boundaries

Heather shared insights from her experience transitioning to an all-remote work environment. 

One important lesson, she explained, is to set boundaries. “If you’re going to maintain high performance, you should also maintain the ability to relax and turn off,” she said. “Remote work can cause burnout when team members don’t identify their limits and make them known,” she added. Heather further recommended that managers purposefully enquire about their team’s boundaries and respect them. Moreover, she said she asks team leaders to identify their limits and communicate them to their team. 

Emma said from her own experience that “performance wanes if we continue to stay on all the time.”

Heather shared her method for setting boundaries: two 30 minute slots of going off-grid each day. Other colleagues, she said, put defined limits on their workdays. “Working six hours as a high-performer is better than working ten hours while feeling 50%,” she explained.

Emma and Heather also discussed proactive communication, team bonding, and other critical strategies for managing high-performance teams. Catch the whole conversation here. 

Watch the rest of the conference, featuring additional discussions between top Silicon Valley engineering leaders, here

PS: Turing’s readers can get two months of free access to a private Sophya digital office for teams of any size by contacting [email protected] 

Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic is sponsored by Turing.com. With Turing, hiring and managing exceptionally talented, pre-vetted remote software developers is automated, speedy, and affordable. Companies have access to a global talent pool of top 1% of 700K+ Turing developers across 140+ countries. 200+ companies, including those backed by Google Ventures, Andreessen, Founders Fund, Kleiner, and Bloomberg, have hired Turing remote software engineers. 

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By May 31, 2021
For Employers

What Does Remote Look Like for the Enterprise, Post-Pandemic? Leaders from Amazon, LinkedIn, and Postmates Share Their Expertise

Leaders from Amazon, LinkedIn, and Postmates discuss strategies for managing remote teams post-pandemic at the Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic Conference.

Helping employees avoid meeting fatigue, the importance of onboarding, and the need for diversity were among the recommendations shared by engineering leaders from Amazon, LinkedIn, and Postmates/Uber at Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic conference, which took place on May 13, 2021.

“What Does Remote Look Like for the Enterprise Post-Pandemic?” was the second session of the thought-provoking conference that Turing sponsors and holds quarterly to help engineering leaders from fast-scaling startups and enterprises meet the challenges of managing remote software development teams.

Key points discussed during the enterprise session:

Avoid “meeting fatigue”

Sumir Chadha, Co-Founder & Managing Director, WestBridge Capital Partners, began the session by asking his fellow panelists to share lessons learned from going remote. Aditya Modi, Senior Engineering Manager, LinkedIn, discussed a typical problem remote teams face: “meeting fatigue” caused by overcommunication. 

He recommended managers be mindful of the number of meetings they schedule. He suggested consolidating meetings and inviting only those team members who would find the discussion relevant. He also cautioned against back-to-back meetings and instead recommended having frequent breaks between them. 

Agreeing, Aabhas Sharma, Director of Engineering, Postmates/Uber, revealed that his team has a similar approach: it sets meeting hours that work for all time zones, allowing employees to have flexible schedules outside of those hours to avoid fatigue.

Kintan Brahmbhatt, GM, Amazon, said his team follows a practice of “no-meeting days or times,” wherein teams avoid get-togethers altogether on particular days of the week or month. 

Self-onboarding is a critical investment

Sumir sought the panel’s advice on managing remote teams for the first time. In response, the experts stressed the importance of smooth onboarding for newly remote teams. 

Aabhas introduced the concept of self-onboarding. He pointed out that synchronous onboarding sessions can be difficult for teammates located in different time zones. Instead, managers should equip new hires with the resources to onboard themselves, he added. “Self-onboarding resources were a critical investment for the Postmates team,” he mentioned. 

Kintan, too, said he preferred thorough document-sharing to one-on-one onboarding meetings and shadowing. “Increased documentation makes it easier for new employees to understand the rhythm of the organization,” he explained. “The right support and mentorship structure can also be crucial,” he added. 

Diversity is a crucial feature of remote teams

Sumir asked leaders about the importance of diversity in remote teams. Aditya said, “Remote work helps companies access a bigger pool of talent, which organically creates diversity.” This has worked well in LinkedIn’s interest, he added. 

Kintan commented that remote work is inclusive of different races and ethnicities and different personality types. “Hiring remotely instead of locally has helped bring forth newer perspectives and diversity of thought,” he explained.

Aabhas called remote work a significant “bias remover” during the hiring process. “Biases that would apply during in-person interviews disappear in remote hiring,” he said. In-person interviews draw attention to dressing styles, features, and overall appearance, while remote hiring doesn’t, he added. 

Eric Nguyen, Head of Engineering, Getaround, revealed that affinity groups—groups of people from similar backgrounds and their allies—have become an important social space for employees at his company. Himself a member of affinity groups like Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Eric added that such groups have helped support many meaningful conversations. 

The group of leaders also discussed everything from hiring strategies for the hybrid world to the importance of proactive communication. Watch the entire conversation here

Head here to watch a recording of the Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic Conference.

Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic is sponsored by Turing.com. With Turing, hiring and managing exceptionally talented, pre-vetted remote software developers is automated, speedy, and affordable. Companies have access to a global talent pool of top 1% of 700K+ Turing developers across 140+ countries. 200+ companies, including those backed by Google Ventures, Andreessen, Founders Fund, Kleiner, and Bloomberg, have hired Turing remote software engineers. 

 

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By May 28, 2021
Prepping for the New Normal (5).jpg
For Employers

Silicon Valley Tech Leaders Discuss How They’re Prepping for the Post Pandemic World

Silicon Valley tech leaders shared insights on retaining top talent, engaging distributed teams, and succeeding in the post-pandemic new normal at Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic conference, held on May 13, 2021.

Silicon Valley tech leaders shared insights on retaining top talent, engaging distributed teams, and succeeding in the post-pandemic new normal at Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic conference, held on May 13, 2021. 

“Prepping for the New Normal: To Office or Not To Office,” the first panel of the conference, featured experts from Postmates/Uber, Cushman & Wakefield, and VergeSense. The panel discussed creating positive outcomes for companies navigating the post-pandemic world and overcoming the challenges of managing various engineering teams, from all-remote to hybrid. 

Key highlights of the conversation: 

Workers will lead the way 

Moderator Akshay Thakor, SVP of Operations, Turing, kicked off the discussion by asking the panel of leaders to share their vision of the post-pandemic workplace. 

Gabe Burke, Managing Director, Cushman & Wakefield, said that workers—not employers—will decide how the new normal will look. “There’s nothing more important than recruiting top talent. If the talent insists on hybrid or remote work, most companies will follow,” he explained. 

Agreeing, Hetal Shah, VP of Engineering, Postmates/Uber, said, “Companies that don’t provide flexibility will see an increase in attrition. This will drive change.”

Nellie Hayat, Head of Workplace Transformation, VergeSense, explained that leadership teams are out of touch with employees. This lost connection has led to a disconnect between what management teams want and what employees need, she added. 

To prove this disconnect, Gabe shared a powerful statistic: Only 4% of employers believe that remote workers prefer full-time, in-person work. Yet, 28% of them plan to ask employees to return to in-person, full-time. He cautioned against this, saying, “Talent will get hybrid or remote work if they demand it.” 

Teams that engage with each other stay together

Akshay further asked the panel about the challenges and opportunities of retaining global talent pools. 

In response, Gabe highlighted one such challenge: helping employees connect with the company’s goals. He said that physical work environments make it easier for employees to understand a company’s vision. Remotely, it’s difficult to show workers how each individual contribution brings value to the company, he added.

“Employees can feel disengaged in remote settings,” agreed Nellie. She continued, “Such settings often lack frameworks of support for employee engagement.” Nellie suggested using tools specifically to identify and measure engagement. 

Agreeing, Hetal stressed the importance of occasional in-person interactions to engage remote teams. He recounted his experience at eBay as an example: His globally distributed team conducted offsites at the start of every quarter. This brought the team together to discuss essential strategies and exchange crucial feedback. 

Trust is a critical factor in the employer-employee relationship

Akshay asked the group to share tips to help employers and workers succeed in the new normal.

“It is vital for employers to trust their workers,” Hetal commented. “Give employees the ownership and responsibility to be successful,” he added. 

This trusting relationship should be mutual. Hetal asked employees to feel comfortable asking for help from leadership teams. He encouraged them to be transparent about their work schedule to find the right work-life balance. 

The group further discussed everything from strategies for supporting remote and hybrid teams to nurturing employees’ talents. Catch the entire conversation here

Head here to watch the rest of the Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic Conference and hear leaders from LinkedIn, Amazon, Postmates/Uber, and more top companies share valuable insights. 

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By May 26, 2021
Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic
For Employers

Top Takeaways from Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic Event

Engineering Leaders from Amazon, LinkedIn, Postmates/Uber Share Insights for Building Successful Remote Teams Post-Pandemic.

Engineering Leaders from Amazon, LinkedIn, Postmates/Uber Share Insights for Building Successful Remote Teams Post Pandemic

Creating opportunities for rapport building among team members, understanding employee needs post-pandemic, and supporting downtime for remote workers were three of the key insights engineering leaders and remote work experts shared at Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic conference. Turing leaders also discussed exciting new product updates to Turing’s Intelligent Talent Cloud. 

The virtual conference, held May 13, 2021, to discuss sourcing, vetting, onboarding, and managing remote software teams in a post-pandemic world, featured speakers from Amazon, LinkedIn, Cushman & Wakefield, Postmates, and WestBridge Capital Partners, as well as several fast-scaling startups. #ScalingPostPandemic was the latest in Turing’s series of quarterly virtual conferences.

Top takeaways from the event: 

Talent will rule the day

Moderator Akshay Thakor (Turing) kicked off the first panel discussion, “Prepping for the New Normal,” by asking leaders about their vision of the post-pandemic world.

Gabe Burke (Cushman & Wakefield) and Hetal Shah (Uber/Postmates) both declared that talent will drive workplace transformation in the new normal. “If the talent insists on hybrid or remote working models, then most companies will eventually give in to their needs,” said Gabe. 

Hetal agreed, saying, “Companies that can provide flexibility to their employeeswhether it’s a hybrid approach or something similarare going to be winners.”

Nellie Hayat (VergeSense) pointed out that, currently, leadership teams are out of touch with employees’ needs for flexibility. “There’s a gap between what employers want and the reality of what employees need,” she explained.

Gabe cited a survey by Littler to show this disconnect. 71% of employers surveyed believe that most employees would prefer a hybrid model; only 4% believe that most employees who work remotely would like to return to full-time, in-person work. Despite this, 28% of employers plan on having most employees return full-time and in person.

The group further discussed strategies for retaining talent pools, questions for remote leaders to reflect on, and advice for remote workers. Watch the full discussion here

Boundaryless teams need boundaries too 

Emma Giles (Sophya) kicked off the fireside chat, “How Does LinkedIn Approach Remote Work?”, by asking LinkedIn VP of Engineering Heather McKelvey to share her own experience and learnings from going all-remote.

Heather emphasized the need for setting boundaries. Working from home can cause high-performance teams to lose track of the number of hours they work, causing burnout, she explained. 

“If you’re going to maintain high performance, you should also maintain the ability to relax and turn off,” she said.

Emma agreed, sharing her experience with her own team. “Performance wanes if we continue to stay on all the time.”

Heather explained a solution to potential burnout that LinkedIn has developed. LinkedIn shuts down twice a year for one week. This year, the company realized employees weren’t taking time off due to the pandemic and the shift to remote. To help workers cope, the firm closed for an extra week in April, Heather said. 

Heather said her own method of setting boundaries includes going completely offline for at least two 30 minute slots per day. Other colleagues, she mentioned, cope by working six hours a day. “Working six hours as a high-performer is better than working ten hours while feeling 50%.”

Emma and Heather also discussed tactics for mentoring remote teams, celebrating team wins, and connecting with each other. Catch the full conversation here

PS: Turing’s readers can get two months of free access to a private Sophya digital office for teams of any size by contacting [email protected]

The key to remote success: deliberate personal communication

Two panels“What Does Remote Look Like for the Enterprise?” and “How Should Startups Think About Remote Work and Distributed Teams Today?”found common ground at #ScalingPostPandemic around the importance of communication. 

Leaders from both the enterprise and startup panels said proactive, intentional personal communication between remote team members is critical to success. 

In the enterprise panel, Aditya Modi (LinkedIn) explained the reasoning behind this to moderator Sumir Chadha (WestBridge Capital Partners): relationships get built organically within on-premise teams. Remote teams, however, require more effort. “When everyone is remote, you must carry out team bonding deliberately,” Aditya said. 

Kintan Brahmbhatt (Amazon) said frequent one-on-one calls, catch-ups with colleagues, and personal chats are important strategies for ensuring teams bond as a unit. 

In the startup panel, Greg Moulton (PocketBuildings) also cited a lack of personal communication as a potential problem. He stressed strengthening relationships in remote teams with in-person meetings. 

“We want to bring the company to our employees,” Greg explained. He said he plans to move his team around to different members’ localities, enable them to experience different cultures, and get to know each other on a deeper level.  

Similarly, Tray Lewin (AIKON) mentioned the significance of continuous engagement in onboarding and mentoring new employees. “You need to be proactive and regularly ask people if they’re getting what they need,” he said. 

The startup panel also touched upon hiring best practices, remote work surprises, and transitioning to boundaryless work. Head here for the full conversation. 

Meanwhile, the enterprise panel also discussed diversity in engineering teams, onboarding new employees, and effective distributed meetings. Watch the complete session here

PS: you can get a 50% discount on PocketBuildings’ Enterprise License by emailing [email protected] with the word ‘Turing’ in the subject line.

Turing’s Intelligent Talent Cloud solves hiring pain points

Turing’s Co-Founder & CTO Vijay Krishnan, along with Chul Kwon, Senior Growth Product Manager, and Rivers Evans, Director of Sales, showcased the latest updates to Turing’s Intelligent Talent Cloud. Designed to help companies better source, vet, and manage remote developers, the updates included: 

  • A unique self-serve system that allows customers to instantly find pre-vetted software developers based upon their exact needs, easily set up interviews, and hire developers they choose within days vs. weeks or months required for traditional approaches to hiring software engineers.
  • Enhanced deep developer profiles, that provide rich representations of a developer’s strengths, experience, and expertise across a wide range of capabilities, all, validated by Turing’s intelligent vetting platform. 
  • Significant advancements to Turing’s ML-powered vetting system, including the ability to accurately predict an individual developer’s likelihood of being a good fit for a customer’s specific role or needs.

The event concluded with an urgent call-to-action from Turing’s CEO and Co-Founder Jonathan and Ashu Garg, Turing investor and co-founder at WestBridge Capital Partners. Jonathan and Ashu spotlighted the ongoing COVID-19 surge in India and shared how event attendees could help through support of One More Breath, which aims to provide beds with oxygen support in the hardest-hit Indian regions. To donate, visit onemorebreath.org. You can also help by spreading the word through their Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

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By May 18, 2021
Hack The Rare Hackathon
For Developers

Hack The Rare Hackathon: Turing Developers Come Together to Build Software for Rare Disease Treatments

At Hack The Rare Hackathon, Turing developers teamed up with OpenTreatments Foundation to build software to support the development of rare disease treatments.

Today, software is everywhere. From addressing our daily needs to solving complex engineering problems, software is transforming almost every industry. 

Medical treatments are no exception. By enabling the treatment of unusual diseases, software has helped save lives. However, there is still tremendous opportunity for technology to help scientists discover treatments and cures for rare illnesses.

To find out if software engineers can create novel solutions to save lives, Turing organized the “Hack The Rare” hackathon. Participating engineers built open-source software tools to support the development of treatments for rare, devastating diseases affecting 400 million patients worldwide. The event, organized in collaboration with OpenTreatments Foundation, brought together talented developers from around the world.

Why a hackathon?

Most rare diseases have too few patients for biotech companies to develop treatments profitably. For many atypical ailments, patients must take the lead to develop treatments for their conditions by starting a non-profit organization, learning the science, and partnering with researchers. For this hackathon, software developers worldwide came together for four days between April 23rd and 27th. They built specialized tools to empower such patients to create treatments.

Hack The Rare Projects

The hackathon featured four projects that participants could choose from. The goal of their projects is to help patients get one step closer to life-saving treatments. 

  • Patient registry: The first goal for any rare disease is to identify other patients around the world diagnosed with the same illness. For this project, participants created a web or mobile app for newly diagnosed patients to register and associate themselves with the disease in question.
  • Activity tracker: Patients with rare diseases often struggle with basic activities such as sleeping, eating, walking, talking, etc. A patient’s activity is one of the most reliable indicators of their disease’s progression and their treatment’s effectiveness. In this project, participants created a web or mobile app to help patients track and record their activities and identify abnormal patterns.
  • Data vault: Storing data from research experiments is one of the hardest challenges for patients. Data is typically stored in hard drives or cloud drives without proper labeling and tracking. In this project, participants created a data vault to help patient-led organizations securely store files,  connect them to research projects, and share with individuals in need.
  • Materials API: Biomedical research involves physical materials such as reagents, animals, cells, chemicals, etc. When patients begin research to find a treatment, they struggle to find suitable materials to get started. In this project, participants created an API or web app to store, retrieve, and order such materials. 

Throughout, participants applied their tech skills to build innovative software solutions. OpenTreatments Foundation’s CEO Sanath Kumar Ramesh carefully evaluated the projects to identify the winners. 

Hack The Rare WinnersThe first prize went to a team led by Favour Ori. Favour and his fellow engineers Fawas Kareem and Oluwatunmise Adenuga worked on building a patient registry project. Badis Marabet won second prize for his solo registry project.

If you are a passionate software developer hoping to make an impact, you can apply to become a Turing remote developer and shape the boundaryless ecosystem. You can also make your mark on rare disease treatments by contributing to the development of the OpenTreatments software platform. Check out their source code on Github.



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By May 12, 2021
Tuirng Distinguished Speaker Series Henrik Hussfelt
For Employers

Becoming an Effective Engineering Leader: Proxy’s Henrik Hussfelt Chats with Turing CEO Jonathan Siddharth for the Turing Distinguished Speaker Series

The latest episode of Turing Distinguished Speaker Series sees Turing CEO Jonathan Siddharth discuss remote work with Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Eng. at Proxy.

Turing’s Distinguished Speaker Series brings together engineering managers and remote work experts to discuss effective engineering leadership strategies and the secrets behind managing talented, distributed teams. In the latest episode, Jonathan Siddharth, Turing CEO and Co-Founder, hosts an insightful chat with Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering at Proxy. Proxy is a fast-growing startup that provides digital identities for the physical world and was named to Forbes’ list of the Next Billion-Dollar Companies.  

Jonathan and Henrik’s conversation focused on the qualities of excellent engineering team culture, including regular personal interactions, transparency, pairing team members with complementary personality traits, and much more.   

Here are three key takeaways from the conversation:

Hiring for personality fit is a crucial strategy

When recruiting candidates for his distributed engineering team, Henrik explained: “I almost always recruit on personality. It has to be a personality match with the team members that I already have.” According to Henrik, finding the perfect addition to your team isn’t about looking for a candidate’s specific traits. It’s about assessing whether these personality traits will gel with the rest of the team. 

“To create a successful team, you need different types of personalities within your team to work together collaboratively,” Henrik said. 

Jonathan likened recruiting the right engineers to solving a puzzle. Making the right hire is no different than finding the right piece to complete your puzzle, Jonathan said. 

Transparency is the key to success

A vital element of a great engineering culture, according to Henrik, is transparency. Henrik emphasized that it’s vital to be transparent about company documentation, team responsibilities, and dependencies. Transparency can help not only when onboarding new team members but also in ensuring a healthy exchange of information between existing teams. Henrik offered GitLab as an example of an organization with a very transparent and open onboarding process. (See Turing’s blog on GitLab’s secrets of running high-performance remote teams).

Henrik advised team leaders to encourage openness. “You want to set up a culture where it’s okay to ask any question.” 

Transparency is a two-way street, Henrik explained,  both managers and employees must commit to it. Team leaders should clearly outline the goals and objectives behind the team’s tasks, while employees should be encouraged to express their thoughts on said tasks, Henrik added. 

Personal interactions are all the more essential for remote teams

A key difference between remote and non-remote work, Henrik said, is how team members interact. “Personal interactions are crucial in a distributed environment, more so than in a physical one,” he noted. In physical office environments, you can have regular face-to-face communication with team members, Henrik explained. Whereas, in remote environments, you have to pointedly seek out opportunities to have virtual face-time with your employees, he added. 

Henrik said it can be difficult for team members to pick up on subtle signals in distributed environments. He stressed the importance of organically engaging with team members, citing one-on-one meetings as an effective way of doing so. Such interactions can help team leaders pinpoint an employee’s needs, requirements, and bottlenecks, he added.  

Additional Insights

Jonathan and Henrik’s conversation also shed light on management strategies for leading distributed teams for the very first time, juggling time zones, helping employees build meaningful interpersonal relationships, onboarding new employees, and more. 

To see the full conversation, check out Turing’s YouTube channel. Let us know your thoughts about the conversation in the comment section. You can also suggest speakers you’d like to see on future episodes of the Turing Distinguished Speaker Series. 

 

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By May 11, 2021
For Employers

How Should Engineering Leaders Scale Teams in a Post-Pandemic World? Experts from Google, Facebook, Uber, Postmates Explain

Hear from Silicon Valley engineering managers and remote work experts at Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic Conference, on May 13th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT. 

The pandemic drove a rapid — and in many cases unplanned — shift to remote work across Silicon Valley and the US. Now as we move into the post-pandemic world, engineering leaders at fast-scaling startups and global enterprises are asking themself how the new “normal” will yet again change the way they source, vet, hire and manage software development teams. 

Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic, Turing’s next event in a series of quarterly virtual conferences, is designed to provide insights and answers that will help engineering managers lead their teams into the post-pandemic future. Attendees will hear from Silicon Valley senior engineering leaders and remote work experts from companies like Google, Facebook, Uber, Postmates, among many others.

Agenda Highlights

Register today to hear from Silicon Valley engineering managers and remote work experts at Turing’s Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic Conference, on May 13th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT. 

  • Prepping for the New Normal: A detailed discussion with engineering leaders on how to prepare for the new normal, from all-remote to hybrid teams. 
  • How to Scale Up in a Post Pandemic World: An insightful chat among CEOs and founders of fast-scaling startups on how the pandemic has changed the conventional approach to scaling and managing software teams and what new strategies they are employing to drive continued success. 
  • Post-Pandemic Management of Enterprise Software Dev Teams: A conversation with senior leaders of enterprise-scale engineering teams on the best strategies for leading such teams in the post-pandemic new “normal.” 
  • Leading High-Performance Remote-First Teams: A fireside chat between experts on building meaningful connections in our virtual world. 
  • Evolution to the Intelligent Talent Cloud: A deep dive into how the Intelligent Talent Cloud will change the way companies find, vet, hire, and manage engineers. 
  • Hiring Pain Points and How to Fix Them: A sneak peek into how Turing’s boundaryless software can solve common hiring challenges. 

Key Speakers

Kintan Brahmbhatt GM Podcasts (Director) at AmazonKintan Brahmbhatt, GM, Amazon,    where he leads global product teams  responsible for the Amazon Music experience

Heather McKelvey VP of Engineering at LinkedInHeather McKelvey, Vice President of Engineering at LinkedIn, and former engineering leader at MyVest, Basho, and Netscape/AOL

Hetal Shah ex-VP of Product & Operations at PostmatesHetal Shah, ex-VP of Product & Operations at Postmates, which Uber recently acquired in a $2.65B deal

Gabe Burke, Managing Director at Cushman & WakefieldGabe Burke, Managing Director at Cushman & Wakefield, one of the largest real estate services firms in the world

Aabhas Sharma, Director of Engineering at Uber

Aabhas Sharma, Director of Engineering at Uber — by way of its Postmates acquisition — and former Tech Lead/Manager at Sosh

Eric Nguyen, VP of Engineering at GetaroundEric Nguyen, Head of Engineering at Getaround, a car-sharing platform with 5 million users and a presence in 300 cities and 7 countries

Nellie Hayat, Head of Workplace Transformation at VergeSense a Y-Combinator backed workplace analytics platformNellie Hayat, Head of Workplace Transformation at VergeSense, a Y-Combinator backed workplace analytics platform

Sumir Chadha, Co-founder & Managing Director at WestBridge Capital PartnersSumir Chadha, Co-founder & Managing Director at WestBridge Capital Partners, a $3.3B fund previously known as Sequoia Capital India

Aditya Modi, Senior Engineering Manager at LinkedInAditya Modi, Sr. Engineering Manager at LinkedIn, where he leads two teams in creating product architecture to serve 700M+ LinkedIn members

Palash Soni, Co-Founder at GoldcastPalash Soni, Co-Founder at Goldcast, which counts Underscore, Afore, and AngelList’s Access Fund among its backers

Tray Lewin, Co-Founder, CTO at AIKONTray Lewin, Co-Founder, CTO at AIKON, and former CTO at Abaka Inc, Connect, and Stream Productivity

Greg Moulton, SVP at Pocket BuildingsGreg Moulton, Senior Vice President at Pocket Buildings and former Director at HELIX RE. Inc

Mark Derbecker, VP of Engineering at SeeqMark Derbecker, Vice President of Engineering at Seeq, an analytics  platform that has raised a total of $115.2M in funding

Christopher Bunting, Engineering Manager at Abstract

Christopher Bunting, Former Engineering Manager, Abstract, a design intelligence platform with customers like Cisco, Microsoft, and Zendesk 

Jonathan Siddharth Turing CEO

Jonathan Siddharth, CEO & Founder at Turing.com 

 

Akshay Thakor, SVP of Operations at TuringAkshay Thakor, SVP of Operations at Turing and former VP Ops at Postmates 

 

To learn how these engineering leaders and remote work experts are adapting their management styles to the new normal, register today.

The future is Boundaryless! What about you?

Boundaryless: #ScalingPostPandemic is sponsored by Turing.com. With Turing, hiring and managing exceptionally talented, pre-vetted remote software developers is automated, speedy, and affordable. Companies have access to a global talent pool of top 1% of 700K+ Turing developers across 130+ countries. 200+ companies, including those backed by Google Ventures, Andreessen, Founders Fund, Kleiner, and Bloomberg, have hired Turing remote software engineers. 

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By May 4, 2021
zinnov confluence 2021
For Employers

Turing CEO, Jonathan Siddharth, Discusses Employee Experience in the Hybrid Workplace at Zinnov Confluence 2021

Jonathan joined expert panelists to discuss the rise of remote work, strategies and challenges of hiring remote workers, and the need for organizational transparency.

Jonathan joined expert panelists to discuss the rise of remote work, strategies and challenges of hiring remote workers, and the need for organizational transparency.

Jonathan Siddharth, CEO, and co-founder of Turing, joined a panel of executive leaders for Zinnov Confluence, Nurturing Phoenixes: Reimagining Employee Experience in the Hybrid Workplace on March 25th, 2021. The entirely virtual edition of Confluence 2021 – US Chapter highlighted how leaders should adapt to disruptions shaped by technology and talent in the post-pandemic new normal.

Delving into the intricacies of employee engagement and mental well-being, sustaining a positive mindset, and providing timely assistance, the session showcased how organizations rose above the challenges posed by the pandemic and embraced remote and hybrid work environments.

Along with Jonathan,  panelists included Vijay Shah, CEO, and President of V2Solutions; Richa Gupta, Chief People Officer at Castlight Health; Vibha Misra, Vice President and Head of HR  for SAP Silicon Valley; and Vamsee Tirukkala, Chief Commercial Officer and Co-founder of Draup (Session Chair). 

Zinnov Confluence: Panelists discuss employee experience in the hybrid workplace

Here are some of the key takeaways from the panel:

The Future of Work is Remote

“The big shift,” Jonathan says, “is going forward, all work will be remote work and all teams will be distributed — even globally distributed — teams. In the new normal, a tremendous amount of work is going to be remote or remote-hybrid.” Jonathan continued, “In the future, the three things that people will have to keep in mind are:

  1. Mastering  asynchronous communication 
  2. Enforcing consistency in how teams communicate
  3. Having a great culture

“These are three things to double down on in this new normal,” Jonathan added.  

Trends in Employee Management and Engagement

Vibha shared that SAP’s priorities as an organization were employee safety and well-being. Addressing the challenges that her team faced while going remote, she recounted: “One of the challenges for us was community building. With community building, we started going virtual and encouraged people to come together and form teams (to perform various activities together).” 

Talking about the unique trends he had observed in terms of employee engagement, Vijay outlined: “(The past year) has been an opportunity for new players to shine in a new light. Discoveries that we would’ve never made have been expedited. Passive individuals have become remarkable leaders.” He further elaborated that as an organization, his company gave precedence to staying calm and not adding to anxiety people were already feeling. 

The Need for Organizational Transparency 

Vijay stated that the FSAT score i.e. the Family Satisfaction score helped V2Solutions in gauging the overall productivity of the team and measuring their anxiety levels. “We ran a survey where the employees didn’t have a say but the family members had a say on how the employees were doing,” he explained. 

Adding to the discourse on maintaining organizational transparency, Jonathan said: “When you’re operating as a remote distributed team, the most important thing is asynchronous communication. At Turing, we have a very detailed onboarding process where we ensure that the person understands the organizational context, the different teams that work together along with the metrics they care about, and the company’s priorities quarter by quarter. We write all of this down and share it with people because we don’t want people to be stuck in Slack silos, where they don’t know what’s happening in other channels.”

Jonathan also accentuated the importance of setting up frequent checkpoints and periodic follow-throughs to maintain transparency, where possible. “I encourage my teams to have in-person meetings where it’s safe to do so. Remote work does not mean you never meet and are always in Zoom. Some of our teams occasionally have socially distanced meetings, if they’re comfortable doing so,” he elaborated. 

Trust and Wise Compassion 

Further, into the session, the speakers shared views on the best practices that companies should adopt when working remotely. “Communication is key for any successful change management. It’s important to communicate truthfully with the employees and set the right expectations,” observed Vibha. She also underscored the importance of defining organizational behaviors, conducting employee trust surveys, and giving back to society to nurture organizational culture. 

Adding to this theme, Richa noted: “The one concept that I have learned and taught my managers (at Castlight Health) is the concept of wise compassion. The economy went through some complex changes and we don’t have a day to skip a beat. We have to keep the work going, and we have to keep the people going. Getting tough things done in a humane way is wise compassion.” She stated that connecting people digitally on common causes was imperative for ensuring healthy communication between teams and individuals. 

Hiring remote – Strategies and Challenges  

The panelists also discussed principal factors to keep in mind while hiring remote talent. Drawing attention to employers’ proclivity to hire the best in the world, Jonathan shared: “If you’re hiring in a remote-first world it is important to look into countries that have high-quality talent but not enough local opportunity. There is great talent all over the world, you just need to have a data-driven process that can evaluate a really large top of the funnel.” 

On the challenges of remote hiring, he stated: “If you’re hiring a great engineer from Sao Paulo, Brazil, you may not see Stanford or Berkeley on their resume. You won’t see Google or Facebook in their work experience. But these may still be great people. Since you cannot filter by resume or LinkedIn profile, you have to assess through light-weight technical tests for screening, which creates a level playing field.” 

Jonathan also spoke about the significance of conducting asynchronous tests while evaluating remote candidates. “We find testing to be very fair in terms of elimination of bias. We don’t care what the people look like or sound like, we just care whether they can do the job,” he asserted. 

The session left the audience with notable insight on evolving employee experience amidst the pandemic and concluded with an optimistic outlook for a remote-friendly future. 

Watch the entire session here



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By Apr 22, 2021
For Employers

Turing Leaders Explain How They Built the World’s Most-Advanced Vetting and Matching System

Turing’s Vijay Krishnan, Zan Doan, Chul Kwon, and Alex Sung explain the science behind the world’s most-advanced vetting and matching system .

The fourth and final session of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere conference saw an all-Turing exec team explaining how they built the world’s most-advanced vetting and matching system to match developers from across the globe with top Silicon Valley opportunities.

The speakers for this session included Turing.com co-founder and CTO Vijay Krishnan, VP of engineering Zan Doan, senior growth product manager Chul Kwon, and senior product manager Alex Sung.

Describing the reason behind the consistent increase in the number of customers demanding Turing developers, Vijay said: “The reasons are threefold—intelligent vetting, speed of hiring, and scalable quality control.”

The panelists also shed light on several other innovative Turing products generating significant value for both companies and developers.

Zan told the audience how Turing uses the lessons from Facebook, Google, Uber, and other top engineering organizations to produce an intelligent vetting engine. 

He said: “At Turing, we cover all important vetting areas that help us to vet great engineers.” 

“We created more than 100 automated assessments that not only cover the vetting standards followed in the Bay Area but also assess other critical aspects of an engineer,” Zan added.

Zan also explained how Turing’s intelligent management system addresses the three main concerns relating to remote work—communication, performance, and management.

He said: “For communication, we have daily standups, bi-weekly 1-on-1s and time zone overlap; for performance and productivity tracker, we have performance reviews, Turing virtual machines; and for ease of management, we have payments, contracts, and billing security.”

During his demo, Chul helped the audience understand how Turing’s automated seniority assessment test, algorithm coding interview, and automated vetting flows help companies hire top engineers in days rather than weeks. 

“By leveraging data science, we have reduced vetting time to just six hours. Radically reduced vetting time means you can have the world’s best engineers, not in sixty days but less than a week. The purpose of Turing is to help you get your dream engineers on-demand,” Chul said.

Next, Alex decoded Turing’s deep developer profile with a crisp and clear presentation. “Turing developer profiles are detailed, comprehensive, continuously updating, representations of our developers. They only show validated skills, and on-the-job performance data enrich them,” he said.

Alex also spoke about the Turing Workspace and the Turing Virtual Machine’s importance in managing remote talent efficiently and keeping firms’ code safe, respectively.

In the end, Vijay explained the data science and machine learning efforts at Turing and how they helped the company in building deep developer profiles, powering its vetting process, and sourcing from a wider developer pool.

The session helped the audience understand Turing’s ‘deep jobs’ platform better and how it helps companies find the best remote developers across skills with the push of a button.

The guest list for the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere conference included Darren Murph, Head of Remote, GitLab; Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com and Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel among others.

All the sessions of the event are now streaming on YouTube. Head over to Turing’s YouTube channel and let us know what you liked the most about each session in the comment section.

 

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By Mar 16, 2021
For Employers

How to Create a Seamless Remote Work Culture? Alex Bouaziz, Chris Herd, and Job van der Voort Speak at Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Event

Firstbase’s Chris Herd, Remote.com’s Job van der Voort, and Deel’s Alex Bouaziz join Jonathan Siddharth to discuss remote work at Turing Boundaryless event

An all-CEO panel joined Turing.com co-founder and CEO Jonathan Siddharth on 18 Feb 2021 for the third session of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere conference to talk about the unique challenges and opportunities that a remote workforce brings for organizations.

Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com and Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel, were at their absolute best as they shared their ideas on how to create seamless remote work culture.

Chris kick-started the conversation by sharing his view on how remote work can benefit a company’s culture and its employees. “What many companies are doing right now is replicating the office environment remotely, and that’s causing them to miss many of the benefits,” Chris said.

He urged organizations to look at remote work as a ‘new thing’ and take advantage of the things that are different about distributed teams.

Describing how he sees remote work, Job said: “Remote work allows you to live your life, and work is just a facet of that. I can live wherever I want. I can earn money wherever I want.”

Talking about how remote-first companies could help their employees forge strong interpersonal relationships, both Alex and Job agreed that organizations should try to understand people’s hobbies and express themselves via virtual games, hangouts, etc.

Responding to Jonathan’s question on what CEOs building boundaryless companies can achieve with a remote workforce, Chris said: “Rather than hiring the best person in a 30-mile radius of an office, you can hire the best person anywhere that you can afford for every single role. So there’s this massive talent arbitrage that companies can now fish in a global talent pool, which is incredibly important.”

“The second part is efficiency,” Chris added.  “Not only are our employees more productive and efficient as they’re not distracted in the same way that they are in an open plan environment, but we’re also far more cost-efficient because we’re not spending $15,000 to $50,000 per worker per year on office space,” he added.

Answering the same question, Alex said: “Many companies don’t understand that being distributed means establishing trust. It means that you will not be able to check if all your teammates have their greenlight on Slack every day. That’s just not going to work.” 

“From a trust angle, as long as you understand the mechanism that is right for your team, then you’re setting up the right culture,” Alex added.

Along with the above issues, the panelists also shed light on a host of other problems like hybrid work, disadvantages of being globally distributed, setting up a good home office, time zone management, communication tools, processes, workflows, etc.

There was one more thing apart from the quality of the discussion that grabbed the public’s attention during the session — Job’s webcam and workspace set-up. 

And to the delight of the live audience, Job shared the list of equipment he uses, including his Sony webcam. He also took the opportunity to highlight the importance of ergonomic chairs and desks and how companies should consider providing a budget to employees for it. He also advocated for having a monitor and not just the laptop while working.

“These are simple things that don’t have to be expensive. They make a huge difference in long-term health,” Job said.

The session gave the audience an excellent opportunity to listen to three of the best remote work experts and understand how they handle highly-productive distributed teams.

Apart from these three, a long list of Silicon Valley engineering leaders shared their ideas at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event. The speaker list included some of the best thought leaders like Darren Murph, Head of Remote, GitLab; Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com, among others.

You can watch all the Turing Boundaryless sessions: #BuildFromAnywhere conference on our YouTube channel here and let us know in the comment section which speaker gave you the best insight about remote work.

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By Mar 15, 2021
For Employers

How to Manage Remote Developers? Engineering Leaders Explain in Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Event

Pravin Desale, Suneela Joshi, Anna Chukaeva, Henrik Hussfelt, Andy O’Dower explain how to manage remote developers in Turing’s #BuildFromAnywhere conference.

A panel of high-profile engineering leaders joined Turing.com CRO Prakash Gupta for the second session of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event on 18 February 2021 to share their experiences managing remote developers during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The guest list for the second session included Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy, and Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product at Carlease.com.

From challenges to solutions, the panelists touched upon various issues regarding remote teams. They also revealed their first preference when it comes to fully-remote or hybrid. Here are the key takeaways from the session in case you missed it.

Describing the hurdles that his team faced during the early months of the pandemic, Pravin said. However, his organization had to deal with many challenges starting from product development processes to customers’ data safety. They learned a lot out of those problems.

“I think it has made our company better for the future. There’s no question about it,” Pravin said.

Expressing similar thoughts, Suneela said: “We were forced to take on remote, but it has worked out well.”

She also explained how her company tried a mix of remote and office-going employees to mitigate the challenges.

Henrik, who was one of Proxy’s first remote engineers, while sharing his experience, said: “When Covid hit, the whole company had to do what we did every day. But getting the organization to get to the same state took quite a while.”

Andy, who is now with live streaming platform Wowza, told the audience that they had to make some changes and break some old tools and some old habits as part of the leadership team.

“I think we were able to grow the business certainly and help customers in a time of need, but it did require both company changes and a roadmap change in our product,” he said.

During her turn, Anna said that the challenges for her organization were all about the people. “We need to build trust. And trust is hard to build, especially if somebody is remote and in a different time zone. How are we going to do that?” she said. The answer she explained was in listening to your team members and implementing their feedback.

Moving ahead, the speakers also spoke about the many steps that they took to overcome the initial challenges of remote work.

According to Henrik, he and his team took some ideas from GitLab’s guidebook and implemented them in their organization. He suggested anyone who needs to understand how to run a remote organization should look at that guidebook. You can find the link to the guidebook here.

Talking about distributed teams, Andy said that companies needed a mindset shift when it comes to remote first. He added that previously organizations used to hire candidates keeping the physical office model in mind, but now they must recruit people keeping remote work at the forefront.    

While Pravin spoke about the importance of a sense of belonging and purpose at the individual engineer level, Suneela shed light on factors such as flexibility and empathy for remote employees.

Adding to these two speakers’ views, Anna talked about the significance of feedback in a distributed team and how she implemented a program to collect the proper feedback to solve many of the problems related to remote teams.

The session ended with a small poll where most of the panelists barring Henrik, said they expect their organizations to go for a hybrid remote set-up in a post-Covid world. Henrik voted in favor of a fully-remote setup.

You can watch the entire session on Turing’s YouTube channel and let us know in the comment section what you liked the most about the conversation.

This post concludes our recap of the second of the four sessions of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event. Keep checking this space for highlights from the rest of the sessions.

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By Mar 15, 2021
For Developers

Turing Named One of America’s Best Startup Employers for 2021 by Forbes

Turing ranked 16th out of the 500 companies selected for Forbes’ list of America’s Best Startup Employers for 2021.

Turing.com has earned a coveted spot on Forbes’ List of America’s Best Startup Employers for 2021. Out of 500 companies named to the illustrious list, Turing ranked 6th in the Business Products and Software Services category and 16th overall. 

Leading media outlet Forbes teamed up with market research firm Statista to identify fast-growing startups that employees love. Forbes lauded the selected employers for “attracting and engaging employees through virtual games, classes, and support systems in a year unlike any other.” 

Forbes compiled the list using an innovative methodology based on three key factors, namely employer reputation, employee satisfaction, and growth. Ultimately, Forbes made their selections through an in-depth analysis of over 7 million data points. Out of 10,000 eligible American businesses, only 500 firms made it to Forbes’ list of the best startup employers.

To Turing, this recognition is more meaningful, especially because of its exclusively remote workforce. The company works hard to cultivate an inclusive, positive, and engaging work culture for its globally distributed team of employees. 

The accolade is a testament to how united Turing’s team members are behind the company’s mission to source, vet, hire, match, and manage remote software developers for top-tier US companies. Driven by the company’s core values of continuous improvement, speed, and focus on long-term customer-centricity, Turing’s employees are dedicated to shaping the future of work. 

What’s more, Turing has witnessed exponential growth in the past year and a half, adding several brilliant, highly-skilled employees to its global team. The company continues to grow in size and strength in tandem with its thriving and rapidly multiplying base of 300K developers looking to find jobs with top US companies. 

“We’re thrilled to be named one of America’s Best Startup Employers by Forbes,” said Turing CEO and co-founder Jonathan Siddharth. “Our employees are the backbone of our organization. I’m proud of what we’ve achieved together. This accolade will help accelerate our mission to hire the best talent in the world, irrespective of location.”

The Forbes honor comes close on the heels of other industry-wide recognitions for Turing, such as its inclusion in Fast Company’s prestigious list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021. 

You can find Forbes’ complete list of America’s Best Startup Employers here. While evaluating Turing, Forbes reviewed articles, blogs, social media posts, Turing’s online reviews, website traffic, and company headcounts. To learn more about the Forbes methodology in detail, head here.  

If you’re a company looking to build globally distributed, exceptionally talented software teams, Turing can help you hire from the top 1% of the world’s remote developers. If you’re a brilliant software engineer looking to work at Silicon Valley and US-based companies, you can apply now to remote Turing jobs.

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By Mar 12, 2021
For Employers

Turing Named to Fast Company’s Annual List of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021

Leading media outlet Fast Company names Turing to its annual list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021.

Turing has been named to Fast Company’s prestigious annual list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies for 2021. 

Fast Company published the list today, saying it “honors the businesses that have not only found a way to be resilient in the past year but also turned those challenges into impact-making processes. These companies did more than survive; they thrived—making an impact on their industries and culture as a whole.”

Fast Company named Turing one of the top 10 companies in the Workplace category, noting Turing’s contribution to enabling companies to source, vet, hire, and manage remote workers during the pandemic.  

“In a year of unprecedented challenges, the companies on this list exhibit fearlessness, ingenuity, and creativity in the face of crisis,” said Fast Company Deputy Editor David Lidsky, who oversaw the issue with Senior Editor Amy Farley. Fast Company is one of the world’s leading media outlets covering technology, design, and innovation.

“We are thrilled to be named one of the world’s most innovative companies by Fast Company,” said Jonathan Siddharth, co-founder, and Turing CEO. “Turing created the first and only intelligent talent cloud in 2020 using innovations in data science to drive sourcing, vetting, matching, and managing of remote software developers across the globe for US-based fast-scaling startups, tech unicorns, and global enterprises. We have changed an entire industry, reducing friction and helping companies hire elite remote software developers in as little as three days, compared with an industry standard of many weeks to months.”

Jonathan further explained Turing’s role in democratizing opportunity for talented people everywhere. “Talent is global, but opportunity is not. We are working to change this by opening up exceptional opportunities for talented developers regardless of where they happen to live,” he said.

Fast Company said, to create the list, its editors and writers “sought out the most groundbreaking businesses across the globe and industries.” 

The World’s Most Innovative Companies list is Fast Company’s signature franchise and one of its most highly anticipated editorial efforts of the year. “It provides both a snapshot and a road map for the future of innovation across the most dynamic sectors of the economy,” Fast Company said. 

Fast Company’s Most Innovative Companies issue (March/April 2021) is now available online here, as well as in app form via iTunes and on newsstands beginning March 16, 2021. #FCMostInnovative. 

US companies looking to build and scale remote teams of software developers can, with Turing, hire from a giant, global talent pool of 200,000+ senior, pre-vetted software engineers. Exceptionally talented remote developers looking to work with the best companies in the world can apply to remote Turing jobs now.

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By Mar 9, 2021
For Employers

Key Takeaways from Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Event

Top engineering leaders who have built large, remote developer teams for tech unicorns, pre-IPO companies, and enterprises came together at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event on 18 February 2021 to discuss the strategies, tactics, and tools for creating and managing high-productivity remote teams.  Turing.com co-founder and CEO Jonathan Siddharth kicked off the event with opening… View Article

Top engineering leaders who have built large, remote developer teams for tech unicorns, pre-IPO companies, and enterprises came together at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event on 18 February 2021 to discuss the strategies, tactics, and tools for creating and managing high-productivity remote teams. 

Turing.com co-founder and CEO Jonathan Siddharth kicked off the event with opening remarks where he elaborated about the massive advantages of being a remote-first company and why Silicon Valley tech giants are going for distributed teams.

“The new way is to look for the best people in the world who could contribute to your company’s success, not the best people who happen to be living near your office,” Jonathan said.

The guest list for the conference included Darren Murph, Head of Remote, GitLab; Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com and Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel among others.

The much-awaited event delivered what it promised and much more as all the sessions were full of solid nuggets of wisdom. Here are the key takeaways from each session of the event in case you missed it.

1st Session: Secrets of Running High-Performance Remote Teams

GitLab’s Head of Remote, Darren Murph, joined Jonathan for the first session and discussed the do’s and don’ts behind successful remote-first companies. The conversation was full of new ideas as the duo touched upon various issues ranging from the importance of culture in remote work to asynchronous communication to time zone management. 

Answering Jonathan’s questions, Darren explained some of the key concepts of remote work like ‘transparency and belonging,’ ‘psychological safety,’ ‘values fit,’ ‘documentation,’ etc., in detail.

“Many companies haven’t drawn the parallel between transparency in your work and belonging in your culture. But what we believe is that the more transparency and visibility that the entire team has to each other’s work, the easier it is for people to feel like they belong.” Darren said.

“Belonging is crucial to culture, especially in a remote environment,” he added.

During the session, Darren also shared his views about remote-first and hybrid-remote companies.

2nd Session: Managing Remote Engineers – Lessons from the Field

Turing.com CRO Prakash Gupta moderated the second session featuring renowned engineering leaders including Pravin Desale, Suneela Joshi, Anna Chukaeva, Andy O’Dower, and Henrik Hussfelt.

The high-profile panelists, who had gone through the challenges of managing remote teams during the initial months of the Covid-19 pandemic, gave the audience a unique opportunity to understand the key lessons that they had learned from the field. 

“Remote-first is a mindset that you must apply to every aspect of your management,” Andy said. 

The engineering leaders also discussed the formulae that they implemented during the pandemic to continue to hire, onboard, and define success for a remote software engineer.

 The session ended with a small poll where most of the panelists, barring Henrik, said they expect their organizations to go for a hybrid-cum-remote set-up in a post-Covid world.

3rd Session: Avoiding the Pitfalls of Managing a Global Remote Workforce

A new ‘remote-work mafia’ joined Jonathan for the penultimate session to discuss some of the challenges and opportunities to create a seamless, remote work culture. Firstbase’s Chris Herd, Remote.com’s Job van der Voort, and Deel’s Alex Bouaziz were at their absolute best during the conversation to give the audience an enthralling panel discussion.

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By Mar 5, 2021
For Employers

GitLab’s Darren Murph reveals secrets of running high-performance remote teams at Turing’s #BuildFromAnywhere Event

Darren Murph, GitLab’s head of remote, shares the do’s and don’ts of high-performance remote teams at Turing’s Boundaryless #BuildFromAnywhere Conference

If you ever had a question regarding the successful management of remote teams, then you need to listen to GitLab’s Head of Remote, Darren Murph. Darren leads people, culture, operations, inclusivity, marketing, employer, branding, and communications at GitLab,  one of the world’s most successful remote startups with more than 1,300 employees distributed across 67 countries.

Murph recently sat down with Turing.com CEO Jonathan Siddharth for a conversation at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference and revealed his secrets for hiring and running high-performance remote teams.

He touched upon various issues ranging from the importance of culture in remote work to asynchronous communication to time zone management. He also shared a few interesting suggestions for remote-first as well as hybrid-remote companies. Here are the key takeaways from the session in case you missed it.

Transparency and Belonging

Keeping everyone working together as one unit when they’re all remote is a challenge for any company. So, when Murph was asked by Siddharth how GitLab handles such an issue, he credited Gitlab’s tooling and culture for successfully addressing the problem. He also pointed out the significance of ‘transparency’ and ‘belonging’ for healthy relationships.

 “Many companies haven’t drawn the parallel between transparency in your work and belonging in your culture. But what we believe is that the more transparency and visibility that the entire team has to each other’s work, the easier it is for people to feel like they belong,” Murph said.

“Belonging is crucial to culture, especially in a remote environment.”

Asynchronous Communication

In remote work, different people work at different times of the day. And this is where, according to Murph, asynchronous communication becomes crucial.

“Asynchronous is what I call the superpower of remote teams. That is the sign that you’ve evolved past the skeuomorphic ‘shift and lift type of approach,’ where you try to copy the office environment and paste it into a virtual environment, into one where you’re much more thoughtful about how work can take shape and take place,” Murph said.

During the conversation with Siddharth, he also stressed that it is not just a matter of efficiency and productivity; it is also about respecting the other person’s time.

 “We think it’s a matter of respect. If you can move a project forward without demanding that someone be online at the same time as you, you’re fundamentally more respectful for [Sic] their time.”

Signaling is Important

Murph also touched upon the subject of a post-Covid-19 world. Siddharth asked what possible mistakes firms should avoid after the pandemic. Darren said companies should not let their exec teams rush back to offices as it has a negative signaling effect.

“If you have a long-term lease on a building, and you will have people back into that building, make sure that the executives stay out to help force your workflows. We call these forcing functions to be more inclusive and remote first.”

And for those who are considering a hybrid-remote structure, Murph urged them to be very careful. “It’s fundamentally more difficult to manage and make equitable two different playing fields compared to one or the other.”

Where You Work or How You Work?

One of the key things that Murph told Siddharth during the conversation was that a lot of the proven principles on all-remote and remote-first are equally applicable to hybrid-remote or even co-located organizations.

“Remote first isn’t about where you work. It’s about how you work. So if someone chooses to go to the office, they shouldn’t work fundamentally differently than if they’re at their home. So when you’re thinking about what are the considerations to make sure hybrid goes well, convert all of your work processes so that they’re equally seamless away from the office as they are in the office,” he said.

Talking about some of the well-known tools that GitLab uses, Murph explained why they just use existing tools in innovative ways.

Answering Siddharth’s question about using the popular app Slack at GitLab, Murph said that Slack messages expire after 90 days at his organization. 

And the reason behind this is that Gitlab wants its staff to work in their internal platform as it is “far more transparent and less siloed than working in Slack.”

Now, like many, you might be wondering how and why GitLab uses Slack then?

According to Murph, people at GitLab don’t use Slack for work; instead, they use it to communicate with their colleagues about other things like parenting and hiking and cooking, etc. “It’s a lot easier to use that as a bit of a virtual water cooler and have human-to-human conversations when you are also expected to do work in the same medium.”

Culture of Documenting Everything

The Head of Remote also explained the vital role that documentation plays for a company.

 “It makes your day more efficient when you don’t have to answer things over and over and over. If you answered it once, you’re able to share the link around,” he said.

“If it’s not in the handbook, it doesn’t exist. And we’re serious about that. We try very hard to make sure that we ask others what we would expect from ourselves, which is document, document, document. So the people around the world and whatever [Sic] timezone they’re in have more access to that information.”

Psychological Safety

When asked by Siddharth to give a piece of advice that CEOs of remote-first companies can follow to bring people together, Murph said, “Create psychological safety so that people can be who they are.”

He believes that people in the leadership should encourage employees to bring their individualized stories back to the workplace.

“Those are the real stories that give you insight into who your colleagues are. And those stories are much more valuable than small talk about the weather. But it requires leadership to say, we trust that you can build culture outside of work, and we’re going to create a psychologically safe atmosphere for you to bring that back into work.”

Values Fit

Shedding light on one of the secrets behind GitLab’s success, Murph told the audience they take candidates through GitLab’s values during the interview to see if people align from a value standpoint.

“We don’t even hire for culture fit. We hire for values fit,” Darren said.

“As long as we’re assured that we’re both working in accordance to the same values, then we want all of that individual brought to work.” 

In the end, Murph also shared the link to GitLab’s handbook on running remote-first teams while answering a couple of questions from the audience. You can watch the full session on Turing’s YouTube channel and let us know in the comment section what you liked the most about the conversation.

Apart from Murph, a long list of Silicon Valley engineering leaders shared their ideas at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildfromAnywhere event. The speaker list included some of the best thought leaders like Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Suneela Joshi, Sr Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com; Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel among others.

This was the recap of the first of the four sessions of the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildfromAnywhere event. Keep checking this space for highlights from the rest of the sessions. 

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By Mar 1, 2021
For Employers

Silicon Valley Tech Leaders to Share Strategies for Managing High-Productivity Remote Teams – #BuildFromAnywhere

Register Today to Hear from Silicon Valley Engineering Leaders and Remote Work Experts at Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference, on February 18th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT Have you ever wondered how successful remote-first companies source, vet, and hire their offshore developers? Or how they manage remote teams at scale to solve for speed… View Article

Register Today to Hear from Silicon Valley Engineering Leaders and Remote Work Experts at Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference, on February 18th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT

Have you ever wondered how successful remote-first companies source, vet, and hire their offshore developers? Or how they manage remote teams at scale to solve for speed and quality?

If you have, then here’s your chance to listen to the top minds in the business at the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event and find answers to the above questions.

Silicon Valley engineering leaders from fast-scaling startups and global brands will discuss the strategies behind successful remote software development teams. Register now to get an opportunity to learn how engineering leaders from Facebook, Google, Uber, and Stanford successfully solve the various problems that come with distributed teams.

These experts, who have built large, remote engineering teams for tech unicorns, pre-IPO companies, and global enterprises, will also present the latest strategies, tactics, and tools for creating and managing high-productivity remote teams.

The guest list for the much-awaited event includes some of the best thought leaders who will share their ideas with you live. Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas; Darren Murph, Head of Remote, GitLab; Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories; Chris Herd, CEO, Firstbase; Anna Chukaeva, Co-Founder / COO, Carta Healthcare; Job van der Voort, CEO, Remote.com; Henrik Hussfelt, Director of Engineering, Proxy; Andy O’Dower, Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of Product, Carlease.com; Alex Bouaziz, CEO, Deel among others will be joining the event.

For more information, including the agenda, please visit the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event page. 

Check back regularly to stay updated as we add additional speakers to the agenda.

The Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere will take place on February 18th, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT.

Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere is sponsored by Turing.com, an automated platform that lets companies hire Silicon Valley-caliber remote developers at the touch of a button from a global talent pool of more than 200,000 software engineers.

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By Feb 11, 2021
Boundaryless Build From Anywhere Event
For Employers

How Do Engineering Leaders from Facebook, Google, Uber & Stanford Hire and Manage Remote Teams?

At Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference, engineering leaders are all set to discuss how to source, vet, onboard, and manage talented remote teams.

Join Us to Learn from Elite Engineering Leaders and Remote Work Experts at Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Conference, on February 18th from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. PT

If you’ve ever wondered how engineering leaders at some of the world’s biggest companies hire and manage distributed software development teams, you’re in luck…

Today’s engineering leaders have the opportunity to hire talent from anywhere in the world. Boundaryless teams mean you can hire not based upon geography, but talent and specific needs. Remote, distributed engineering teams, also provide new levels of diversity, the kind that research shows increase productivity and creative thinking

Save your spot! Register Today to Learn how to Solve Your Remote Work Challenges
This new way of working comes with challenges. How do you source, vet, and onboard remote developers? Once onboarded, how do you manage such developers to maximize performance, integration, and communication?

On February 18th, beginning at 11 AM PST, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from senior executives that have scaled companies leveraging the power of distributed engineers from all over the world. 

Highlights of Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event include:

  • An intimate conversation with senior leaders including Suneela Joshi, Sr. Director of Engineering, Abbott Laboratories, and Pravin Desale, SVP of SDS and Appliances, Veritas, as they share their hard-won knowledge in our “Lessons from the Field” panel
  • Sneak peeks at the tools and technologies the fastest-growing companies rely on to help them build elastic engineering teams, virtually at the push of a button
  • A one-on-one fireside chat between GitLabs Head of Remote, Darren Murph, and Turing CEO and Co-Founder, Jonathan Siddharth

Who should attend? 
Whether you need to hire a single engineer or multiple product development teams, Turing’s Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere event will help you understand how remote-first companies overcome the challenges of having a fully distributed structure. It will also show how they leverage global talent to save time, speed product development, and avoid the many bottlenecks that happen when your recruiting efforts are limited to talent pools within 20 minutes of a home office.

If you’re an engineering manager, a senior executive with hiring responsibility, or a founder that needs to build a team in a hurry, Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere will give you a competitive advantage when it comes to finding, and managing the talent that will help you meet your objectives faster, more efficiently, and within budget.

So if you are looking for the latest strategies, tactics, and tools for creating and managing high-productivity remote software development teams, register today to hear from: 

Darren MurphDarren Murph
Head of Remote, GitLab

Chris Hear FirstbaseChris Herd 
CEO, Firstbase

Suneela Joshi Abbott LaboratoriesSuneela Joshi
Sr. Director of Engineering,
Abbott Laboratories

Pravin Desale VeritasPravin Desale
SVP of SDS and Appliances,
Veritas

Anna Chukaeva Carta HealthcareAnna Chukaeva
Co-Founder/COO,
Carta Healthcare

Job van der Vort Remote.comJob van der Voort  
CEO,
Remote.com

Alex Bouaziz DeelAlex Bouaziz
CEO, Deel

Henrik Hussfelt ProxyHenrik Hussfelt
Director of Engineering, Proxy

Andy O’Dower Carlease.comAndy O’Dower
Veteran Product Engineering Leader, Former Head of  Product,
Carlease.com

 

For more information, including the agenda, please visit the Turing Boundaryless: #BuildFromAnywhere Event Page. Do remember to check back regularly as we add additional speakers to the schedule.

The future is Boundaryless! What about you?

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By Feb 2, 2021